My debut novel, A Superior Spectre, acquired by Peter Bishop Books

I'm excited, delighted, nervous... It's been quite a journey to get to this point. If you've been reading this blog for the last 10 years – well, you've been along for much of the ride (thank you). I hope you'll enjoy it when it comes out in 2018 (I believe around August). Here's the official … Continue reading My debut novel, A Superior Spectre, acquired by Peter Bishop Books

Parsley and blood: Bitter Greens by Kate Forsyth

April 2012 Random House 9781741668452 (buy paperback, ebook) I love a good historical novel: the ability to contrast past and present, to be absorbed in a world that’s (mainly) unfamiliar, and to experience vastly different circumstances, pressures, and social customs. Kate Forsyth allows us to taste, smell and feel 16th Century Italy and late 17th … Continue reading Parsley and blood: Bitter Greens by Kate Forsyth

Writing on writing: guest post by Harry Bingham

  I've been a professional writer for more than ten years,  but it was only recently, when asked to produce a How to Write book by A&C Black/Bloomsbury, that I came to think systematically about this craft of ours. I mean 'systematically' in two different dimensions. First, there's the whole area of technique. How, precisely, … Continue reading Writing on writing: guest post by Harry Bingham

Guest review: Lyndon Riggall on Embassytown by China Miéville

9780230754317 Pan Macmillan, May 2011 (Aus, UK, US/Kindle) Reviewed by Lyndon Riggall I admit defeat. I’ve been trying to present these events with a structure. I simply don’t know how everything happened. Perhaps because I didn’t pay proper attention, perhaps because it wasn’t a narrative, but for whatever reasons, it doesn’t want to be what I want to … Continue reading Guest review: Lyndon Riggall on Embassytown by China Miéville

A dream-logic London squid riff: an interview with China Miéville (part two)

Read part one here. Angela Meyer: Just going back to what you were sort of talking about, the excessive nature of Kraken (Aus, US, UK) and chucking everything in – I’m really interested in your writing and I just find it so rich but at the same time I found I still was reading it … Continue reading A dream-logic London squid riff: an interview with China Miéville (part two)

Guest review: Chris Flynn on Justin Cronin’s The Passage

The Passage Justin Cronin (Aus, US) Orion 9780752897851 Reviewed by Chris Flynn It’s funny how movies influence books so much these days. The fact that The Passage was optioned by Sir Ridley Scott for $1.75 million within a week of Cronin settling on a $3.75 million publishing deal for his vampire apocalypse trilogy is unsurprising … Continue reading Guest review: Chris Flynn on Justin Cronin’s The Passage

Last weekend’s literary connectivity, and what I’ve been reading lately

On the weekend I was up in sunny Brisbane for the Australian Booksellers Association 2010 conference. It’s a conference for members and friends of the ABA – so, booksellers, publishers, and some librarians and media. I was officially there as a ‘blogger’ – on a panel called ‘Customers, Connections and Communities’, with Andrew McDonald from … Continue reading Last weekend’s literary connectivity, and what I’ve been reading lately

Dan Brown’s The Lost Symbol goes well with cheap wine, corn chips and reading into the morning

The most blockbustery blockbuster of the year found its way into my lap and with curiosity piqued (and a break needed from festival preparations) I indulged in one solid reading session – cover to cover – and was mainly intrigued, despite a few small snags. In The Lost Symbol, Harvard Professor Robert Langdon is called … Continue reading Dan Brown’s The Lost Symbol goes well with cheap wine, corn chips and reading into the morning