Melbourne Writers Festival 2009 diary part eight: why Australian literature?

Instead of doing this session by session (as the last two days are a blur) I'll just write it as it comes out. * First of all, Why Australian Literature? looked at our national literature and it's current 'crisis', that of globalisation and the possible 'swamping' of other voices and literatures. The panel featured Peter … Continue reading Melbourne Writers Festival 2009 diary part eight: why Australian literature?

Christos Tsiolkas + Nam Le: award winners

In honour of the recent awards won by two authors I admire very much, I thought we could revisit my interviews with them. First of all, which awards were these? Christos Tsiolkas won the Commonwealth Writers' Prize for Best Book, awarded at the Auckland Writers' and Readers' Festival last week, for The Slap. See the full details here. … Continue reading Christos Tsiolkas + Nam Le: award winners

‘Discomfort is sometimes what is most precious to me about great art’ – Christos Tsiolkas on The Slap

Note: This review/interview is uncensored and contains swearing. The Slap (Aus, US) is a novel that grabs you by your tender spots, squeezes, and doesn't let go. Set in contemporary Melbourne and its suburbs, a man slaps another person's child at a barbeque. From there, the narrative expands out to the lives of several characters of … Continue reading ‘Discomfort is sometimes what is most precious to me about great art’ – Christos Tsiolkas on The Slap