'I want to read that, too!' Wanting to know and be everything (but then take my time with something)

The Christmas party season is in full swing. I've forgotten names, drank too much, jumped on a trampoline, been told secrets, held hands with sweaty strangers (swing dancing), stuttered (kinda a new one) and swapped WIP stories with emerging and published writers. There's a lot of pressure to be in the know. To have read … Continue reading 'I want to read that, too!' Wanting to know and be everything (but then take my time with something)

Guest review: Derek Motion on Tiggy Johnson’s First Taste

Page Seventeen, 2010 9780980813609 Reviewed by Derek Motion      I often have to catch the bus out to the university, and from the stop near my house the journey takes around 15 minutes. This parcel of time is – if you get straight on to the task and don’t waste any time looking out the window … Continue reading Guest review: Derek Motion on Tiggy Johnson’s First Taste

Melbourne Writers Festival 2009 diary part five: words like triangles (a further experiment in the confessional)

This post is a creative, experimental mash-up of personal experience plus one of the poems Bernhard Schlink read on Sunday 23 August in RMIT Capitol Theatre, in a session called 'Pleasure and Pain: Poetry and the Body' at Melbourne Writers Festival. The poem is called 'Ballad of the Outer Life' or 'Ballade des auBeren Lebens', and is by … Continue reading Melbourne Writers Festival 2009 diary part five: words like triangles (a further experiment in the confessional)

A Very Short Introduction to the Absurd, My Absurd Moment, and Lester Burnham as Absurd Hero…

Albert Camus The Myth of Sisyphus was one of those books I attacked with dog-ears and pen marks. Whole pages are underlined in my well-thumbed copy, which I revisited when writing my novel manuscript Smoke & Dancing, and recently for my thesis. I think about my own steps to lucidity, when I acknowledged life’s inherent … Continue reading A Very Short Introduction to the Absurd, My Absurd Moment, and Lester Burnham as Absurd Hero…