Black Postcards: Kent MacCarter interviews Dean Wareham (part two)

Part one of this interview can be found here. How do you feel about TS Eliot’s (in)famous quip, 'Good poets borrow, great poets steal'? I was having a hard time figuring out what TS Eliot meant here – what’s the difference between borrowing and stealing in poetry? So I Googled that phrase (the internet is … Continue reading Black Postcards: Kent MacCarter interviews Dean Wareham (part two)

Black Postcards: Kent MacCarter interviews Dean Wareham (part one)

By Kent MacCarter Dean Wareham – musician, author, actor and a co-inventor of the ‘shoegaze’ aesthetic – is coming home to Australia. Sort of. This month, he, his partner Britta Phillips, and band will be touring Australia and New Zealand playing entire sets from seminal rock band, Galaxie 500, 19 years after their demise and … Continue reading Black Postcards: Kent MacCarter interviews Dean Wareham (part one)

Meeting Alex Miller part one: on the origins of a contemporary story

Recently I interviewed Alex Miller about his new novel Lovesong  (Aus, US) for Readings Monthly. As many of you know, Miller is not only one of Australia’s finest authors, but he's one of my personal favourites, so I took this wonderful opportunity to extend my conversation with him to his other works, as well as writing and life … Continue reading Meeting Alex Miller part one: on the origins of a contemporary story

This cumulative kind of effect when you stop: an interview with Emily Maguire on Smoke in the Room, part one

In Smoke in the Room (Aus), three characters end up in a share house in Sydney. Katie works on instinct and is weighted by an overwhelming empathy. Adam, an American, is grieving and needs to save money to get home. Graeme, an aid worker, has rid himself of possessions and simplified his existence. In this … Continue reading This cumulative kind of effect when you stop: an interview with Emily Maguire on Smoke in the Room, part one

‘Discomfort is sometimes what is most precious to me about great art’ – Christos Tsiolkas on The Slap

Note: This review/interview is uncensored and contains swearing. The Slap (Aus, US) is a novel that grabs you by your tender spots, squeezes, and doesn't let go. Set in contemporary Melbourne and its suburbs, a man slaps another person's child at a barbeque. From there, the narrative expands out to the lives of several characters of … Continue reading ‘Discomfort is sometimes what is most precious to me about great art’ – Christos Tsiolkas on The Slap

I'd Like to Introduce You to Two of My Favourite Poets

Sean M Whelan's and Nathan Curnow's poems are very different in both style and theme, but come from much the same place. Nathan captures the poignancy of childhood and the wonderment of parenthood, nostalgia and love in his chapbook No Other Life But This through tiny observations - an arm through a sleeve, a question, a coffee … Continue reading I'd Like to Introduce You to Two of My Favourite Poets