Profits of Doom by Antony Loewenstein

Melbourne University Publishing 9780522858822 (paperback) 9780522864366 (ebook) August 2013 In Profits of Doom, Antony Loewenstein investigates the effects of predatory, vulture or disaster capitalism on individuals, communities, the environment, and future prospects of entire countries. Loewenstein’s work is powerful because he goes to Afghanistan, Christmas Island, Papua New Guinea, and other places ravaged by greed, … Continue reading Profits of Doom by Antony Loewenstein

Guest review: Gabriel Ng on Various Pets Alive and Dead by Marina Lewycka

Fig Tree (Penguin) 9781905490912 March 2012 (buy paperback) review by Gabriel Ng The title of Various Pets Alive and Dead might make you think it involves lots of cute animal stories and some kind of furry genocide. Instead, it’s a very political novel about the global financial crisis and the failure of the leftist ideals, … Continue reading Guest review: Gabriel Ng on Various Pets Alive and Dead by Marina Lewycka

Between worlds: Dominic Smith on Bright and Distant Shores

  Allen & Unwin, 9781742374161, 2011 (Aus paperback, ebook + US/Kindle) Bright and Distant Shores is hugely imaginative historical fiction. It’s set just before the dawn of the 20th century in Chicago and the South Pacific. Owen Graves is sent by Hale Gray, the president of Chicago First Equitable, to collect some ‘special items’ to … Continue reading Between worlds: Dominic Smith on Bright and Distant Shores

Raj Patel: Messiah? Or Sydney Writers Festival guest…?

So you may have heard about author Raj Patel being deemed a Messiah by a religious group after appearing on The Colbert Report recently. Well I have heard more exciting rumours, that Patel - the author of The Value of Nothing - will be gracing our shores at Sydney Writers Festival this year. The program for the … Continue reading Raj Patel: Messiah? Or Sydney Writers Festival guest…?

Capitalism is funny – a review of Max Barry's Company

Company, Max Barry, Scribe, 9781921215643, 2008 (Aus, US) Jones joins Zephyr as an enthusiastic employee, without even knowing what the company does. This doesn't seem to be an odd thing at Zephyr, where Jones' coworkers in the Training Sales department just accept that Zephyr is a ‘holdings' company, and get on with their menial, perpetual … Continue reading Capitalism is funny – a review of Max Barry's Company